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Mercury in some arc crustal rocks and mantle peridotites and relevance to the moderately volatile element budget of the Earth

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dc.contributor.author Canil, Dante
dc.contributor.author Crockford, Peter W.
dc.contributor.author Rossin, Ricardo
dc.contributor.author Telmer, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-27T18:30:20Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-27T18:30:20Z
dc.date.copyright 2015 en_US
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Canil, D., Crockford, P.W., Rossin, R., Telmer, K. (2015). Mercury in some arc crustal rocks and mantle peridotites and relevance to the moderately volatile element budget of the Earth. Chemical Geology, 396, 134-142. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2014.12.029 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2014.12.029
dc.identifier.uri https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10095
dc.description.abstract We measured Hg concentrations in 37 igneous rocks from an arc crustal section and in 30 mantle peridotites from ophiolite, orogenic massif and xenolith settings. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed in the igneous rocks and shows a ‘nugget effect’, suggesting it is concentrated in a trace phase, likely sulfide. The abundance of Hg in the crustal samples varies from 0.9 to 8 ppb and correlates with S and Cu but no other element indicative of differentiation. The average of our data produces 2.9 ± 2.6 Hg for the bulk crust, a factor of 10 lower than previous estimates. The mantle peridotites contained 0.2–5 ppb Hg and a correlation of Hg with Al, Cu, S or loss on ignition (LOI) depending on sample type. Secondary uptake of Hg due to low-temperature alteration or mantle metasomatism is evident in the ophiolite and orogenic massif samples, respectively. The primitive upper mantle (PUM) contains 0.4–0.6 ppb Hg based on the depletion/enrichment trends in the fresh xenolith samples that demonstrably retained primary Cu/S during emplacement. During mantle melting to produce the crust, Hg behaves as a mildly incompatible element (DHg residue/melt ~ 0.1), not unlike Cu. For a chondritic abundance of 310 ppb Hg, our estimate for Hg in the mantle requires this element has a similar depletion to Se, Te or S in the bulk silicate Earth. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This research was supported by NSERC of Canada Discovery Grants to DC and KT. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Chemical Geology en_US
dc.subject mercury en_US
dc.subject crust en_US
dc.subject mantle en_US
dc.subject chalcophile en_US
dc.subject volatile en_US
dc.subject accretion en_US
dc.title Mercury in some arc crustal rocks and mantle peridotites and relevance to the moderately volatile element budget of the Earth en_US
dc.type Postprint en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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