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Examining the Efficacy of a ‘Feasible’ Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables by First Year University Students (17–19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: A Pilot Study

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dc.contributor.author Mistura, Matheus
dc.contributor.author Fetterly, Nicole
dc.contributor.author Rhodes, Ryan E.
dc.contributor.author Tomlin, Dona
dc.contributor.author Naylor, Patti-Jean
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-09T17:04:58Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-09T17:04:58Z
dc.date.copyright 2019 en_US
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Mistura, M., Fetterly, N., Rhodes, R.E., Tomlin, D. & Naylor, P. (2019). Examining the Efficacy of a ‘Feasible’ Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables by First Year University Students (17–19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: A Pilot Study. Nutrients, 11(8), 1786. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081786 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081786
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/11478
dc.description.abstract In the transition from high school to university, vegetable consumption tends to deteriorate, potentially influencing immediate and longer-term health outcomes. Nudges, manipulation of the environment to influence choice, have emerged as important to behavior change goals. This quasi-experimental pilot study examined the impact of a contextually feasible evidence-informed nudge intervention on food purchasing behavior of older adolescents (1st year students) in a university residence cafeteria in British Columbia, Canada. A co-design process with students and staff identified a student relevant and operationally feasible nudge intervention; a placement nudge, fresh vegetables at the hot food table, combined with a sensory and cognitive nudge, signage encouraging vegetable purchase). Using a 12-week single-case A-B-A-B design, observations of the proportion of vegetables purchased were used to assess intervention efficacy. Data analysis included visual trend inspection, central tendency measures, data overlap, variability and latency. Visual trend inspection showed a positive trend when nudges were in place, which was more apparent with female purchases and during the first intervention (B) phase. However, further analysis showed lack of baseline stability, high variability across phases and overlapping data, limiting efficacy conclusions. Menu choices, staff encouragement, term timing and student finances are other potential influences. Further ‘real world’ nudge research is needed. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This research was supported by funding from the British Columbia Ministry of Health. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Nutrients en_US
dc.subject nudge en_US
dc.subject choice architecture en_US
dc.subject vegetable en_US
dc.subject food en_US
dc.subject university en_US
dc.subject students en_US
dc.subject adolescents en_US
dc.subject cafeteria en_US
dc.title Examining the Efficacy of a ‘Feasible’ Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables by First Year University Students (17–19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: A Pilot Study en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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