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Planning for End-of-Life Care: Findings from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

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dc.contributor.author Garrett, Douglas D.
dc.contributor.author Tuokko, Holly
dc.contributor.author Stajduhar, Kelli I.
dc.contributor.author Lindsay, Joan
dc.contributor.author Buehler, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-03T23:19:34Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-03T23:19:34Z
dc.date.copyright 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Douglas D. Garrett. and Holly Tuokko. and Kelli I. Stajduhar. and Joan Lindsay. and Sharon Buehler. "Planning for End-of-Life Care: Findings from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging." Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue canadienne du vieillissement 27.1 (2008): 11-21. Project MUSE. Web. 3 Sep. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cja.27.1.11
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4904
dc.description.abstract Steps involved in formalizing end-of-life care preferences and factors related to these steps are unclear in the literature. Using data from the third wave of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA-3), we examined the relations between demographic and health predictors, on the one hand, and three outcomes, on the other (whether participants had thought about, discussed, or formalized their end-of-life preferences), and considered, as well, whether relations existed among the three outcomes. Canadian region of residence, female gender, and more years of education predicted having thought about preferences; region of residence, female gender, and lack of cognitive impairment predicted discussion of preferences; and region of residence and not being married predicted whether formal documents were in place. Ontario residents were most likely to have thought about, discussed, and formalized their preferences, whereas Atlantic residents were least likely to. Finally, having thought about preferences was associated with discussion, and having thought about and having discussed preferences were each associated with formalization of preferences. These findings are in keeping with the position that Advance Directives (AD) execution is a multi-stage process. A better understanding of this process may prove useful for the development of interventions to promote planning for end-of-life care. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Phases 1 and 2 of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging core study were funded by the Seniors’ Independence Research Program, through Health Canada’s National Health Research and Development Program (NHRDP project #6606-3954-MC(S)); supplementary funding for analysis of the caregiver component was provided by the Medical Research Council. Additional funding was provided by Pfizer Canada Incorporated, through the Medical Research Council / Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association of Canada Health Activity Program, NHRDP (project #6603-1417-302(R)), by Bayer Incorporated, and by the British Columbia Health Research Foundation (projects #38 (93-2) and #34 (96-1)). Core funding for Phase 3 was obtained from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR grant #MOP-42530); supplementary funding for the caregiver component was obtained from CIHR grant #MOP-43945. Additional funding was provided by Merck-Frosst and by Janssen-Ortho, Inc. The study was coordinated through the University of Ottawa and Health Canada. Douglas D. Garrett is supported by a graduate scholarship from the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Annie Kishenblatt Award in Gerontology from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. A research personnel award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Institute of Aging (Senior Investigator Award) supported Dr. Tuokko in the preparation of this manuscript. At the time of this investigation, Dr. Stajduhar was supported with post-doctoral funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR). Currently, Dr. Stajduhar is supported by a New Investigator Award from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and a Scholar Award from the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press en_US
dc.subject aging en_US
dc.subject end-of-life en_US
dc.subject care preferences en_US
dc.subject advance directives en_US
dc.subject formal documents en_US
dc.subject Canadian en_US
dc.subject regional differences en_US
dc.title Planning for End-of-Life Care: Findings from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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