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Aboriginal Rights and Title in Canada After Delgamuukw: Part One, Oral Traditions and Anthropological Evidence in the Courtroom

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dc.contributor.author Thom, Brian
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-10T19:33:15Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-10T19:33:15Z
dc.date.copyright 2001 en_US
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier.citation Thom, Brian. (2001) Aboriginal Rights and Title in Canada After Delgamuukw: Part One, Oral Traditions and Anthropological Evidence in the Courtroom. Native Studies Review. 14(1):1-26. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://iportal.usask.ca/docs/Native_studies_review/v14/issue1/pp1-26.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6244
dc.description.abstract The 1997 Delgamuukw decision of the Supreme Court of Canada has been an important moment in determining the nature and extent of Aboriginal rights and title in Canada. This paper (which is the first part of two-part essay) critically reviews this decision, drawing on anthropological and legal scholarship to put into context how oral histories and anthropological expert witness testimony have been conceived by the Supreme Court. This paper reviews the continuing importance of social science research in general and anthropology in particular for contributing to Aboriginal rights and title debates. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Department of Native Studies, University of Saskatchewan en_US
dc.title Aboriginal Rights and Title in Canada After Delgamuukw: Part One, Oral Traditions and Anthropological Evidence in the Courtroom en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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