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The Sui Generis Nature of Aboriginal Rights: Does it Make a Difference?

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dc.contributor.author Borrows, John
dc.contributor.author Rotman, Leonard I.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-16T19:51:55Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-16T19:51:55Z
dc.date.copyright 1997 en_US
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier.citation Borrows, John & Rotman, Leonard I. (1997). "The Sui Generis Nature of Aboriginal Rights: Does it Make a Difference?" Alberta Law Review, 36(1), 9-45 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0002-4821
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7058
dc.description.abstract The authors trace the development of the use of the term sui generis to describe Aboriginal legal rights, noting that this is not in fact a recent phenomenon. They explain the doctrine as a balance between common law and Aboriginal conceptions, acting as an aid to the development of the common law in a manner which accommodates cultural differences and unique Aboriginal legal rights. The authors critically analyze recent judicial employment of the doctrine, and offer suggestions as to how it could best be employed to reconcile unique Aboriginal issues with the framework of the common law. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Alberta Law Review en_US
dc.title The Sui Generis Nature of Aboriginal Rights: Does it Make a Difference? en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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