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The Shared Pathoetiological Effects of Particulate Air Pollution and the Social Environment on Fetal-Placental Development

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dc.contributor.author Erickson, Anders C.
dc.contributor.author Arbour, Laura
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-05T13:57:41Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-05T13:57:41Z
dc.date.copyright 2014 en_US
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Erickson, A.C., & Arbour, L. (2014). The Shared Pathoetiological Effects of Particulate Air Pollution and the Social Environment on Fetal-Placental Development. Journal of Environmental and Public Health, Vol. 2014, Article ID 901017. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/901017
dc.identifier.uri https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8775
dc.description.abstract Exposure to particulate air pollution and socioeconomic risk factors are shown to be independently associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes; however, their confounding relationship is an epidemiological challenge that requires understanding of their shared etiologic pathways affecting fetal-placental development. The purpose of this paper is to explore the etiological mechanisms associated with exposure to particulate air pollution in contributing to adverse pregnancy outcomes and how these mechanisms intersect with those related to socioeconomic status. Here we review the role of oxidative stress, inflammation and endocrine modification in the pathoetiology of deficient deep placentation and detail how the physical and social environments can act alone and collectively to mediate the established pathology linked to a spectrum of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We review the experimental and epidemiological literature showing that diet/nutrition, smoking, and psychosocial stress share similar pathways with that of particulate air pollution exposure to potentially exasperate the negative effects of either insult alone. Therefore, socially patterned risk factors often treated as nuisance parameters should be explored as potential effect modifiers that may operate at multiple levels of social geography. The degree to which deleterious exposures can be ameliorated or exacerbated via community-level social and environmental characteristics needs further exploration. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by a Canadian Institute of Health Research Grant (IPH-98849). Dr. Arbour is also funded through a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Salary Award. Funders provided no role in the direction of this review paper. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Environmental and Public Health en_US
dc.title The Shared Pathoetiological Effects of Particulate Air Pollution and the Social Environment on Fetal-Placental Development en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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