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Impacts of Climate Change and Intensive Lesser Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) Activity on Surface Water in High Arctic Pond Complexes

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dc.contributor.author Campbell, T. Kiyo F.
dc.contributor.author Lantz, Trevor C.
dc.contributor.author Fraser, Robert H.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-24T20:16:17Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-24T20:16:17Z
dc.date.copyright 2018 en_US
dc.date.issued 2018-11
dc.identifier.citation Campbell, T.K.F., Lantz, T.C. & Fraser, R.H. (2018). Impacts of Climate Change and Intensive Lesser Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) Activity on Surface Water in High Arctic Pond Complexes. Remote Sensing, 10(12), 1892. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10121892 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10121892
dc.identifier.uri https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10542
dc.description.abstract Rapid increases in air temperature in Arctic and subarctic regions are driving significant changes to surface waters. These changes and their impacts are not well understood in sensitive high-Arctic ecosystems. This study explores changes in surface water in the high Arctic pond complexes of western Banks Island, Northwest Territories. Landsat imagery (1985–2015) was used to detect sub-pixel trends in surface water. Comparison of higher resolution aerial photographs (1958) and satellite imagery (2014) quantified changes in the size and distribution of waterbodies. Field sampling investigated factors contributing to the observed changes. The impact of expanding lesser snow goose populations and other biotic or abiotic factors on observed changes in surface water were also investigated using an information theoretic model selection approach. Our analyses show that the pond complexes of western Banks Island lost 7.9% of the surface water that existed in 1985. Drying disproportionately impacted smaller sized waterbodies, indicating that climate is the main driver. Model selection showed that intensive occupation by lesser snow geese was associated with more extensive drying and draining of waterbodies and suggests this intensive habitat use may reduce the resilience of pond complexes to climate warming. Changes in surface water are likely altering permafrost, vegetation, and the utility of these areas for animals and local land-users, and should be investigated further. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by: The Polar Continental Shelf Program; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; ArcticNet; the Northern Scientific Training Program; the Canadian Space Agency Government Related Initiatives Program (GRIP); and the University of Victoria. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Remote Sensing en_US
dc.subject tundra ponds en_US
dc.subject Arctic wetlands en_US
dc.subject desiccation en_US
dc.subject Landsat en_US
dc.subject aerial photographs en_US
dc.subject global change en_US
dc.subject protected areas en_US
dc.title Impacts of Climate Change and Intensive Lesser Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) Activity on Surface Water in High Arctic Pond Complexes en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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