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Why aid efficiency will not deliver development: a feminist legal critique of the aid effectiveness architecture and the Paris Declaration On Aid Effectiveness.

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dc.contributor.author Mitaru, Anne
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-02T18:41:05Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-02T18:41:05Z
dc.date.copyright 2009 en_US
dc.date.issued 2011-06-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3350
dc.description.abstract This thesis will undertake to ascertain the importance assigned to gender equality within the aid effectiveness architecture, and specifically within the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. It will seek to critically analyse the interplay of gender equality with three key components of the architecture- its parties, process and priorities. Using an international feminist legal lens, this critical analysis will seek to interrogate why the advancement of gender equality continues to remain excluded from the ongoing international development discourse, yet, it is argued that people-centered development will only be realised if it remains at the heart of international development law, policy and practice. en_US
dc.language English eng
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject gender en_US
dc.subject equality en_US
dc.subject economic assistance en_US
dc.subject women in development en_US
dc.title Why aid efficiency will not deliver development: a feminist legal critique of the aid effectiveness architecture and the Paris Declaration On Aid Effectiveness. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.contributor.supervisor Harding, Andrew
dc.contributor.supervisor Parisi, Laura Jean
dc.degree.department Faculty of Law en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Laws LL.M. en_US
dc.rights.temp Available to the World Wide Web en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Graduate en_US


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