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Self and collective efficacy as correlates of group participation: A comparison of structured and unstructured computer-supported collaborative learning conditions

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dc.contributor.author Fior, Meghann
dc.date.accessioned 2008-04-29T19:51:20Z
dc.date.available 2008-04-29T19:51:20Z
dc.date.copyright 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008-04-29T19:51:20Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/912
dc.description.abstract This study examines the relationship between self-efficacy for group work and collective efficacy in terms of participation within a computer supported collaborative environment across two collaborative conditions: (a) structured chat, and (b) unstructured chat. The purpose of this study was (a) to examine the relationship between self and collective efficacy and student participation, and (b) to examine the structure of reciprocal teaching roles, scripts and prompts in moderating the relationship between self-efficacy for group work and collaborative chat participation. Data were collected from 62 grade 10 students assigned to one of the two conditions: (a) structured chat enhanced with specific cognitive roles, scripts and prompts, or (b) unstructured chat enhanced by only a text based chat tool. The participants collaboratively discussed a challenging text in groups of 4 using a text-based chat tool. A relationship was found between self-efficacy and participation where collaborative condition moderated the relationship between efficacy and participation. en_US
dc.language English eng
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Available to the World Wide Web en_US
dc.subject Education en_US
dc.subject Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning en_US
dc.subject.lcsh UVic Subject Index::Humanities and Social Sciences::Education en_US
dc.title Self and collective efficacy as correlates of group participation: A comparison of structured and unstructured computer-supported collaborative learning conditions en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.contributor.supervisor Hadwin, Allyson
dc.degree.department Dept. of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts M.A. en_US


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