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Infrastructure for China’s Ecologically Balanced Civilization

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dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Chris
dc.contributor.author Zhong, Ma
dc.contributor.author Corfee-Morlot, Jan
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-26T20:28:55Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-26T20:28:55Z
dc.date.copyright 2016 en_US
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Kennedy, C., Zhong, M. & Corfee-Morlot, J. (2016). Infrastructure for China’s Ecologically Balanced Civilization. Engineering, 2, 414-425. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.ENG.2016.04.014 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/J.ENG.2016.04.014
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/9146
dc.description.abstract China’s green investment needs up to 2020 are ¥1.7 trillion–2.9 trillion CNY ($274 billion–468 billion USD) per year. Estimates of financing requirements are provided for multiple sectors, including sustainable energy, infrastructure (including for environmental protection), environmental remediation, industrial pollution control, energy and water efficiency, and green products. The context to China’s green financing is discussed, covering urbanization, climate change, interactions between infrastructure sectors, and the transformation of industry. Much of the infrastructure financing will occur in cities, with a focus on equity, environmental protection, and quality of life under the National New-Type Urbanization Plan (2014–2020). China has implemented many successful policies in the building sector, but there is still considerable scope for improvement in the energy efficiency of Chinese buildings. China is currently pursuing low-carbon growth strategies that are consistent with its overall environmental and quality-of-life objectives. Beyond 2020, China’s future as an ecologically balanced civilization will rest on the implementation of a central infrastructure policy: China 2050 High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario and Roadmap Study. As exemplified by the Circular Economy Development Strategy and Near-Term Action Plan, an essential part of China’s green industrial transformation involves engineering systems that conserve materials, thereby reducing or even eliminating wastes. To better understand changes to China’s economy under its green transformation and to unlock large potential sources of finance, it is necessary to undertake a fuller examination of all of China’s infrastructure sectors, particularly freight rail infrastructure and ports. Large investments are required to clean up a legacy of environmental contamination of soil and groundwater and to reduce industrial pollution. Transformation of the power sector away from coal will avoid some industrial treatment costs. The contribution of engineers in planning, designing, and constructing China’s new green infrastructure will be furthered by understanding the broad policy context and the interactions between land use, infrastructure, and environmental performance. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Funding for this work was provided by the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Engineering en_US
dc.subject Sustainable engineering en_US
dc.subject Green growth en_US
dc.subject Industrial ecology en_US
dc.subject Low-carbon development en_US
dc.subject Green finance en_US
dc.title Infrastructure for China’s Ecologically Balanced Civilization en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Faculty en_US
dc.description.reviewstatus Reviewed en_US


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