Helping Others Facilitates Well-Being For First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Leaders and Mentors Living with HIV/AIDS

Date

2023-03-17

Authors

Skov, Brittany

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Abstract

Research has found that helping others facilitates well-being for Indigenous peoples living with HIV/AIDS (IPHA), but limited research exists that investigates the mechanism(s) underlying this relationship. Indigenous perspectives posit that helping others facilitates well-being through the development of the spiritual, physical, emotional, and mental aspects (four aspects) of an individual. Similarly, self-determination theory posits that helping others facilitates well-being through the satisfaction of basic psychological needs. In the present study, we examine if helping others facilitates well-being through the fulfillment of the spiritual, physical, emotional, and mental aspects among IPHA. We used a convergent parallel mixed methods design, coupled with a community-engaged approach grounded in principles of GIPA, and Indigenous and decolonizing research methodologies. Survey (n=117) and interview data (n=9) collected by an Indigenous-led HIV/AIDS organization in Canada were employed to examine the relationship between helping, the four aspects, and well-being. Participants were First Nations, Métis, and Inuit leaders and mentors who live with HIV/AIDS. Survey and interview questions examined IPHA leadership experiences, well-being, connection to culture, mastery, connectedness, social support, racism, stigma, and resilience. A parallel multiple mediation model and reflexive thematic analysis (modified using a medicine wheel approach) will be used to analyze the relationship between helping, the four aspects, and well-being. Data will be integrated at the interpretation stage. We expect that helping others will be positively associated with well-being and that this relationship will be fully mediated by the four aspects. This research may facilitate the development of programs to support IPHA well-being, and contributes to the literature on integrating Indigenous perspectives and methodologies within psychological research.

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Keywords

helping, eudaimonic well-being, self-determination theory, Metis, and Inuit, First Nations, wholism, HIV/AIDS

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