The Relations between identity, cultural values and mental health outcomes in Asian adults living in Canada

Date

2012-08-08

Authors

Na, Sumin

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Abstract

The literature on identity and acculturation has discussed many aspects of the ethnic minorities‟ experience that have important implications for the mental health status of these individuals. The goal of the present study was to integrate these findings to create an encompassing picture of how these processes may interact with one another in first-generation Asian immigrants and Asian international students in Canada. Results indicated that one‟s identification to the mainstream and heritage cultures were dependent on one‟s stage in ethnic identity development. Second, it was found that ethnic identity exploration and ethnic identity achievement were differentially associated with reported levels of race-related stress. Third, bicultural conflict and vertical collectivism were negatively associated with psychological outcomes, whereas ethnic identity achievement was positively associated with well-being. Finally, strategies of self-continuity were not associated with the individualism-collectivism measures assessed in the study

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Keywords

Acculturation, Ethnic Minority, Mental Health, International Students, Race-Related Stress, Acculturative Stress, Self-Continuity, Identity

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