An opinion on the debatable function of brain resident immune protein, T-cell receptor beta subunit in the central nervous system

Date

2022

Authors

Komal, Pragya
Manjari, S. K. V.
Nashmi, Raad

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

IBRO Neuroscience Reports

Abstract

In recent years scientific research has established that the nervous and immune systems have shared molecular signaling components. Proteins native to immune cells, which are also found in the brain, have neuronal functions in the nervous system where they affect synaptic plasticity, axonal regeneration, neurogenesis, and neurotransmission. Certain native immune molecules like major histocompatibility complex I (MHC-I), paired immunoglobulin receptor B (PirB), toll-like receptor (TLR), cluster of differentiation-3 zeta (CD3ζ), CD4 coreceptor, and T-cell receptor beta (TCR-β) expression in neurons have been extensively documented. In this review, we provide our opinion and discussed the possible roles of T-cell receptor beta subunits in modulating the function of neurons in the central nervous system. Based on the previous findings of Syken and Shatz., 2003; Nishiyori et al., 2004; Rodriguez et., 1993 and Komal et., 2014; we discuss whether restrictive expression of TCR- β subunits in selected brain regions could be involved in the pathology of neurological disorders and whether their aberrant enhancement in expression may be considered as a suitable biomarker for aging or neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington’s disease (HD).

Description

Keywords

T-cell receptors (TCRs), Major histocompatibility complex I (MHC-I), Central nervous system (CNS), Immune receptors, Neurodegeneration

Citation

Komal, P., Manjari, S. K. V., & Nashmi, R. (2022). “An opinion on the debatable function of brain resident immune protein, T-cell receptor beta subunit in the central nervous system.” IBRO Neuroscience Reports, 13, 235-242. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ibneur.2022.09.003