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The Effects of Extended Time on the Writing of Students with Learning Disabilities: Maximum Potential or Differential Boost?

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dc.contributor.author Goegan, Lauren D.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-22T19:33:08Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-22T19:33:08Z
dc.date.copyright 2014 en_US
dc.date.issued 2014-12-22
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5794
dc.description.abstract Extended time is the most common accommodation requested by post-secondary students with learning disabilities (LD; Lovett, 2010; Ofiesh, 2000; Zuriff, 2000). However, this accommodation has been the topic of much debate (see: Lovett, 2010). Two theories have emerged on this topic, the Maximum Potential Thesis and the Differential Boost Hypothesis (Sireci, Scarpati & Li, 2005; Zuriff, 2000). The current study examines these theories within the context of writing to investigate the performance of students with LD and their non-LD peers. The results do not show support for either theory, when it comes to essay writing across a qualitative dimension (WIAT-II Essay Composition). However, there does appear to be some evidence for the Differential Boost Hypothesis in the areas of word count, which could be considered a quantitative measure of performance. Compared to their performance under regular time conditions, with extended time students with LD wrote more than twice as many additional words compared to their non-LD peers. This research is important so that empirically-informed accommodations for students with LD can be implemented. Recommendations for future research are provided. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Learning Disabilities en_US
dc.subject Extended Time en_US
dc.subject Accommodations en_US
dc.subject Writing en_US
dc.subject Post-Secondary en_US
dc.subject Special Education en_US
dc.title The Effects of Extended Time on the Writing of Students with Learning Disabilities: Maximum Potential or Differential Boost? en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.contributor.supervisor Harrison, Gina
dc.degree.department Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts M.A. en_US
dc.rights.temp Available to the World Wide Web en_US
dc.description.scholarlevel Graduate en_US
dc.description.expiry 2015-11-20 en_US
dc.description.proquestcode 0525 en_US


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