Supporting Harm Reduction through Peer Support (SHARPS): testing the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-delivered, relational intervention for people with problem substance use who are homeless, to improve health outcomes, quality of life and social functioning and reduce harms: study protocol

dc.contributor.authorParkes, Tessa
dc.contributor.authorMatheson, Catriona
dc.contributor.authorCarver, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorBudd, John
dc.contributor.authorLiddell, Dave
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Jason
dc.contributor.authorPauly, Bernie
dc.contributor.authorFotopoulou, Maria
dc.contributor.authorBurley, Adam
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Isobel
dc.contributor.authorMacLennan, Graeme
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-24T00:21:38Z
dc.date.available2020-11-24T00:21:38Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019
dc.description.abstractBackground While people who are homeless often experience poor mental and physical health and problem substance use, getting access to appropriate services can be challenging. The development of trusting relationships with non-judgemental staff can facilitate initial and sustained engagement with health and wider support services. Peer-delivered approaches seem to have particular promise, but there is limited evidence regarding peer interventions that are both acceptable to, and effective for, people who are homeless and using drugs and/or alcohol. In the proposed study, we will develop and test the use of a peer-to-peer relational intervention with people experiencing homelessness. Drawing on the concept of psychologically informed environments, it will focus on building trusting and supportive relationships and providing practical elements of support such as access to primary care, treatment and housing options.en_US
dc.description.reviewstatusRevieweden_US
dc.description.scholarlevelFacultyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to sincerely acknowledge the ongoing support and important contributions of the organisations who are hosting the intervention and the staff within them who support the study on a day to day basis. We would like to acknowledge all the participants who have been recruited to the study without whom it would not be possible to do this research. We would also like to acknowledge the support and guidance that we receive from our Study Steering Group, our Experts by Experience group, our study sponsor and our NIHR Research Manager. Funding The SHARPS study is funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment Board (NIHR HTA 16/153/14). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health. Neither the study sponsor and funders are involved in the study design; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; writing of the report; or the decision to submit the report for publication. Only the study co-investigator team has the authority over these activities.en_US
dc.identifier.citationParkes, T., Matheson, C., Carver, H., Budd, J., Liddell, D., Wallace, J., … Foster, R. (2019). Supporting Harm Reduction through Peer Support (SHARPS): testing the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-delivered, relational intervention for people with problem substance use who are homeless, to improve health outcomes, quality of life and social functioning and reduce harms: study protocol. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 5(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-019-0447-0en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-019-0447-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1828/12375
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPilot and Feasibility Studiesen_US
dc.subjectHarm reductionen_US
dc.subjectSubstance useen_US
dc.subjectPeer Navigatorsen_US
dc.subjectHomelessnessen_US
dc.subjectFeasibility trialen_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.titleSupporting Harm Reduction through Peer Support (SHARPS): testing the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-delivered, relational intervention for people with problem substance use who are homeless, to improve health outcomes, quality of life and social functioning and reduce harms: study protocolen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

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