What's psychology got to do with it? Psychology and climate change

dc.contributor.authorSteg, Linda
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-10T23:36:23Z
dc.date.available2022-02-10T23:36:23Z
dc.date.copyright2021en_US
dc.date.issued2022-02-10
dc.description.abstractClimate change is caused by human behavior, and can thus be reduced when more people more consistently engage in climate action. Many approaches to encourage climate action target extrinsic motivation, by offering incentives that change personal costs and benefits of behaviour. I will explain why such approaches are not always as effective as assumed. I discuss factors and strategies that can strengthen individuals’ intrinsic motivation to engage in sustainable behaviour. Intrinsically motivated people engage in climate action without being coerced or incentivised, even when these actions are somewhat costly, as doing so is meaningful and makes them feel good.en_US
dc.description.reviewstatusUnrevieweden_US
dc.description.scholarlevelFacultyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLansdowne Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1828/13739
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWhat's psychology got to do with it? Psychology and climate changeen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US

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