New plants, new resources, new knowledge: Early introductions of exotic plants to Indigenous territories in northwestern North America

Date

2023

Authors

Turner, Nancy

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Plants

Abstract

Plants have always been important for the Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America. Collectively, these peoples named and used hundreds of different native plant species, along with diverse animal species. When traders and settlers from Europe and other parts of the world arrived in the region, they brought many new species of plants with them. Some (e.g., turnips (Brassica rapa) and onions (Allium cepa)), were from Europe, and some (e.g., potatoes (Solanum tuberosum)) were from South America or elsewhere. Other plants, like dandelion, Taraxacum officinale, probably arrived unintentionally, as weeds. Examining the ways in which the Indigenous Peoples have incorporated these new species into their lexicons and lifestyles provides insight into processes of acquiring and embracing new products and expanding the cultural knowledge base for human societies in general.

Description

Keywords

indigenous food systems, native plant species, northwestern North America, introduced species, changes in food and medicine

Citation

Turner, N. J. (2023). New plants, new resources, new knowledge: Early introductions of exotic plants to indigenous territories in northwestern North America. Plants, 12(17), 3087. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12173087