Climatological Features of the Weakly and Very Stably Stratified Nocturnal Boundary Layers. Part II: Regime Occupation and Transition Statistics and the Influence of External Drivers

Date

2019

Authors

Abraham, Carsten
Monahan, Adam H.

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Abstract

In a companion paper hidden Markov model (HMM) analyses have been conducted to classify the nocturnal stably stratified boundary layer (SBL) into weakly stable (wSBL) and very stable (vSBL) conditions at different tower sites on the basis of long-term Reynolds-averaged mean data. The resulting HMM regime sequences allow analysis of long-term (climatological) SBL regime statistics. In particular, statistical features of very persistent wSBL and vSBL nights, in which a single regime lasts for the entire night, are contrasted with those of nights with SBL regime transitions. The occurrence of very persistent nights is seasonally dependent and more likely in homogeneous surroundings than in regions with complex terrain. When transitions occur, their timing is not seasonally dependent, but transitions are enhanced close to sunset (for land-based sites). The regime event durations depict remarkably similar distributions across all stations with peaks in transition likelihood approximately 1–2 h after a preceding transition. At Cabauw in the Netherlands, very persistent wSBL and vSBL nights are usually accompanied by overcast conditions with strong geostrophic winds Ugeo or clear-sky conditions with weak Ugeo, respectively. In contrast, SBL regime transitions can neither be linked to magnitudes in Ugeo and cloud coverage nor to specific tendencies in Ugeo. However, regime transitions can be initiated by changes in low-level cloud cover.

Description

Keywords

Nonlinear dynamics, Boundary layer, Wind, Climate classification/regimes, Statistics

Citation

Abraham, C., & Monahan, A. H. (2019). Climatological Features of the Weakly and Very Stably Stratified Nocturnal Boundary Layers. Part II: Regime Occupation and Transition Statistics and the Influence of External Drivers. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 76(11), 3485-3504. https://doi.org/10.1175/JAS-D-19-0078.1.