Rapid changes in microbial community structures along a meandering river

dc.contributor.authorCruaud, Perrine
dc.contributor.authorVigneron, Adrien
dc.contributor.authorDorea, Caetano C.
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Manuel J.
dc.contributor.authorCharette, Steve J.
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-23T19:32:44Z
dc.date.available2022-11-23T19:32:44Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_US
dc.date.issued2020
dc.description.abstractStreams and rivers convey freshwater from lands to the oceans, transporting various organic particles, minerals, and living organisms. Microbial communities are key components of freshwater food webs and take up, utilize, and transform this material. However, there are still important gaps in our understanding of the dynamic of these organisms along the river channels. Using high-throughput 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR on a 11-km long transect of the Saint-Charles River (Quebec, CA), starting from its main source, the Saint-Charles Lake, we show that bacterial and protist community structures in the river drifted quickly but progressively downstream of its source. The dominant Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) of the lake, notably related to Cyanobacteria, decreased in proportions, whereas relative proportions of other OTUs, such as a Pseudarcicella OTU, increased along the river course, becoming quickly predominant in the river system. Both prokaryotic and protist communities changed along the river transect, suggesting a strong impact of the shift from a stratified lake ecosystem to a continuously mixed river environment. This might reflect the cumulative effects of the increasing water turbulence, fluctuations of physicochemical conditions, differential predation pressure in the river, especially in the lake outlet by benthic filter feeders, or the relocation of microorganisms, through flocculation, sedimentation, resuspension, or inoculation from the watershed. Our study reveals that the transit of water in a river system can greatly impact both bacterial and micro-eukaryotic community composition, even over a short distance, and, potentially, the transformation of materials in the water column.en_US
dc.description.reviewstatusRevieweden_US
dc.description.scholarlevelFacultyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research project was supported by grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Drinking Water Chair of Laval University (CREPUL), and the program Sentinel North financed by the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF). Steve J. Charette is a research scholar from the Fonds de Recherche du Québec en Santé.en_US
dc.identifier.citationCruaud, P., Vigneron, A., Dorea, C. C., Rodriguez, M. J., & Charette, S. J. (2020). “Rapid changes in microbial community structures along a meandering river.” Microorganisms, 8(11), 1631. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8111631en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8111631
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1828/14514
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMicroorganismsen_US
dc.subjectfreshwateren_US
dc.subjectbacteriaen_US
dc.subjectprotisten_US
dc.subjectloticen_US
dc.subjectCyanobacteriaen_US
dc.titleRapid changes in microbial community structures along a meandering riveren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

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