Study leave report: Radical Collaboration : Medical Librarians, Student Scholarship Competencies and Academic Learning Communities in the 21st Century

dc.contributor.authorRaworth, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-17T00:29:30Z
dc.date.available2015-03-17T00:29:30Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2015-03-16
dc.descriptionPROJECT OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent of undergraduate medical program librarian involvement in student learning communities and in facilitating student achievement of scholarship and research competencies in American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) - accredited Canadian and American medical schools.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Recent calls to reform medical education emphasize the importance of student research and scholarship outcomes. Academic and health librarian associations call for an embedded model of academic librarianship through which librarians may be more engaged with student scholarship. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of librarian involvement in undergraduate medical program student learning communities and in facilitating student achievement of scholarship and research competencies in AAMC-accredited Canadian and American medical schools. Methods: Literature searches were conducted on the topics of renewing undergraduate curricula in relation to 21st century educational paradigms, research and scholarship opportunities available to medical students and the changing roles of medical librarians. A web-based survey, using both closed and open-ended questions, was developed and distributed to librarians with an appointment in AAMC-accredited Canadian and American undergraduate medical schools. The survey focuses on changes occurring as medical schools update their curricula, particularly in the areas of student learning communities, student research and scholarship learning opportunities, and the role of librarians in the student learning communities. Results: Results will determine the extent to which librarians with appointments in AAMC-accredited undergraduate medical schools participate in student learning communities and help students achieve research and scholarship competencies. Discussion: Student learning communities that focus on scholarship and research provide an exciting new and collaborative role for medical librarians.en_US
dc.description.reviewstatusUnrevieweden_US
dc.description.scholarlevelFacultyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported in part by a grant from the Canadian Association of Research Libraries.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1828/5915
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights.tempAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ca/*
dc.subjectmedical librariansen_US
dc.subjectmedical studentsen_US
dc.subjectembeddeden_US
dc.subjectresearchen_US
dc.subjectscholarshipen_US
dc.subjectcompetenciesen_US
dc.subjectacademic learning communitiesen_US
dc.titleStudy leave report: Radical Collaboration : Medical Librarians, Student Scholarship Competencies and Academic Learning Communities in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.title.alternativeMedical Librarians as the “Venn” of Practitioner & Student Research Literacy Skillsen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US

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