Practical Recolonisation?

dc.contributor.authorBorrows, John
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T18:53:20Z
dc.date.available2016-02-17T18:53:20Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2005
dc.description.abstractThe colonisation of Australia can be considered a practical matter and the redistribution of land and political power away from Indigenous peoples and towards others has produced many benefits for the majority of people in the country. The security of non-Indigenous tenure and access to resources has allowed for great financial investment and socio-economic development around the continent. But despite all its seeming practicality, colonisation contains a fatal flaw. It does not provide as many benefits for those who have been colonised. Colonised peoples often suffer a loss of land, restricted access to resources, diminished decision-making authority, and impediments to individual autonomy, while those initiating colonisation enjoy increased land-holdings, preferential resource rights, broad governance powers, and greater individual freedoms.en_US
dc.description.reviewstatusRevieweden_US
dc.description.scholarlevelFacultyen_US
dc.identifier.citationBorrows, John (2005). "Practical Recolonisation?" University of New South Wales Law Journal, 28(3), 614-645.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0313-0096
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1828/7059
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Wales Law Journalen_US
dc.subjectReconciliationen_US
dc.subjectLand tenureen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous peoplesen_US
dc.subjectLand reformen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectColonizationen_US
dc.subjectColonial Influenceen_US
dc.titlePractical Recolonisation?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

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