Neural tissue engineering using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

Date

2011-04-15

Authors

Willerth, Stephanie

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

BioMed Central

Abstract

With the recent start of the first clinical trial evaluating a human embryonic stem cell-derived therapy for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury, it is important to review the current literature examining the use of embryonic stem cells for neural tissue engineering applications with a focus on diseases and disorders that affect the central nervous system. Embryonic stem cells exhibit pluripotency and thus can differentiate into any cell type found in the body, including those found in the nervous system. A range of studies have investigated how to direct the differentiation of embryonic cells into specific neural phenotypes using a variety of cues to achieve the goal of replacing diseased or damaged neural tissue. Additionally, the recent development of induced pluripotent stem cells provides an intriguing alternative to the use of human embryonic stem cell lines for these applications. This review will discuss relevant studies that have used embryonic stem cells to replicate the tissue found in the central nervous system as well as evaluate the potential of induced pluripotent stem cells for the aforementioned applications.

Description

BioMed Central

Keywords

Citation

Willerth SM: Neural tissue engineering using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Stem Cell Research & Therapy 2011, 2:17.